NFL: Seahawks defensive lineman Jarran Reed suspended six games

Jarran Reed
Seattle Seahawks defensive lineman Jarran Reed (90) is eligible to take part in practices and preseason games. (Jim Bryant/UPI file photo)

SEATTLE (UPI) — The NFL suspended Seattle Seahawks standout defensive lineman Jarran Reed for the first six games of this season for violating the league’s personal conduct policy.

League sources told the NFL Network and ESPN on Monday that the violation stems from a 2017 domestic violence case in which Reed was accused of assault.

Reed was not charged or arrested following the incident, but the NFL’s personal conduct policy allows the league to discipline players regardless of the legal outcome. The defender appealed the suspension, which was denied Friday morning, according to the NFL Network.

“I apologize to those close to me including my family, the entire Seattle Seahawks organization and fans of the team for putting myself in a position where I could be disciplined by the NFL,” Reed said in a statement posted to Twitter. “While I totally disagree with the decision of the NFL, I still must accept it and take responsibility for the situation.

“I have learned from this and will do everything I can to make my friends, family, teammates, fans and the Seahawks proud of me moving forward.”

The Seahawks selected Reed in the second round of the 2016 NFL Draft out of Alabama. The defensive tackle is coming off a career-best 10.5 sacks and 50 tackles last season. His 10.5 quarterback takedowns were tied for fourth in the league among defensive tackles last year.

Reed is eligible to participate in practices and play in preseason games. After the regular season starts, he is allowed to return to the team Oct. 14, following the Seahawks’ Week 6 matchup against the Cleveland Browns.

Reporting by Connor Grott

United Press International is an international news agency whose newswires, photo, news film, and audio services provided news material to thousands of newspapers, magazines and radio and television stations for most of the 20th century.

more recommended stories